What’s Next

With the approval of Measure B by Burbank voters in November 2016, planning for the 14-gate replacement terminal will now enter a new phase. The timeline in the PowerPoint link below outlines the critical milestones that must be accomplished in order to build the replacement terminal.

Public outreach and participation will play important roles especially in connection with the conceptual design of the replacement terminal. As detailed in the Development Agreement between Burbank and the Airport Authority that was ratified by Measure B, the conceptual design of the replacement terminal will be crafted through a thorough public process that includes at least six public workshops (charrettes) where members of the Burbank community will provide input.

What's Next for Hollywood Burbank Airport | Measure B

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Will the Airport Authority conduct soil testing on the Adjacent Property?

Yes. This testing will supplement extensive soil and groundwater testing that was conducted prior to the Airport Authority’s acquisition of the Adjacent Property in 1999. The analysis will evaluate the suitability of the Adjacent Property for a Replacement Terminal and will assist in the determination of what mitigation measures, if any, will be required to ensure that development of the Replacement Terminal on the site will not have an adverse impact on construction workers, its future occupants, and property owners.

What testing did the Airport Authority perform when it acquired possession of the property in 1996?

Prior to the Airport Authority’s taking possession of the Adjacent Property in 1996, Lockheed had conducted extensive remediation and testing of the soils before and after remediation. In ­­­­1996-1997 the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board (LARWQCB) issued a number of “No Further Requirements” letters for the Adjacent Property, concluding that there were no further requirements for remediation of the site soils for purposes of groundwater protection.   The Authority completed its acquisition of the Adjacent Property in 1999. From 1996 through 1999 the Authority conducted separate investigations of the area by its own consultant.

Why is more testing needed?

The new testing will supplement the earlier test data. Today’s standards are stricter and the testing procedures are more advanced than those used in the 1990s. As a safety precaution, the Airport Authority wants to make sure that the original findings are still reliable, especially in areas where excavation and construction are proposed, and to assess whether any contamination exists below the proposed terminal building and support structures.

How will the testing be done?

The testing will be done in accordance with a work plan that has been approved by the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board (LARWQCB). An environmental consultant will drill approximately 144 boreholes over the site. The boreholes will be used to collect soil samples at a variety of depths and also to collect soil gas samples from nested soil vapor probes. It is anticipated that the testing will commence in February.

How will the results of the new testing be evaluated?

The Development Agreement between the City and the Airport Authority for the Replacement Terminal Project includes Conditions of Approval to ensure that the project will not create adverse impacts. If necessary, the Airport Authority will implement site remediation measures complying with state standards and will develop a soil management plan to ensure that construction activities will not result in harmful impacts to users and neighbors of the facility.

 

If contamination is found that could cause harmful impacts, what measures will the City of Burbank require for the Airport Authority to construct the Replacement Terminal on the Adjacent Property?

The Development Agreement between the City and the Airport Authority for the Replacement Terminal Project includes Conditions of Approval to ensure that the project will not create adverse impacts. If necessary, the Airport Authority will implement site remediation measures complying with state standards and will develop a soil management plan to ensure that construction activities will not result in harmful impacts to users and neighbors of the facility.

 

What is the environmental history of the Adjacent Property?

Formerly known as Plant B-6, Lockheed used the Adjacent Property for manufacturing from 1941 to 1990. In 1987, acting in concert with the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board (LARWQCB) ordered Lockheed to clean up and abate contamination of soil and groundwater. From 1989 to 1996, Lockheed performed soil remediation work on the site. Under EPA’s direction, Lockheed and others are continuing groundwater remediation efforts beneath the property’s surface. In 2013, the LARWQCB issued a supplemental directive requiring Lockheed to examine various areas for possible hexavalent chromium contamination. Lockheed completed its investigation of soils in the Adjacent Property in 2014 and the LARWQCB issued a letter confirming that no further investigative work and no additional remediation needed to be done on the Adjacent Property.

What is an ALP?

ALP stands for “Airport Layout Plan.” It is a drawing used to depict current and future airport facilities. Under federal law, an airport must keep its ALP up-to-date. For proposed projects like the Replacement Terminal, the FAA must approve a revised ALP prior to approving the project.

What is NEPA?

NEPA stands for the “National Environmental Policy Act.” NEPA requires federal agencies like the FAA to incorporate environmental considerations in their planning and decision-making. All federal agencies must prepare assessments of the environmental impact of and alternatives to federal actions. These statements are commonly referred to as Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) and Environmental Assessments (EA). NEPA is similar to the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). CEQA requires local and state government decision makers to assess the environmental impacts of proposed projects. A major project like the Replacement Terminal usually requires the preparation and certification of an Environmental Impact Report (EIR) prior to a local or state government agency taking a discretionary action about the project. The FAA must undertake a NEPA review of the Replacement Terminal before it can approve federal funding for its construction. Like CEQA, NEPA requires federal agencies to include public participation in reviewing and commenting on the scope and findings of a draft EIS.